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Listings We Love

 
LISTINGS WE LOVE

 

Sometimes we can't help but play favorites. Check out some of our top picks below — and see why we can't get enough of them. (Psst … they're all available if you're ready to move.) 
LA Beach Bungalow
The beachy bungalow 
What we love: admiring that bold, beautiful backsplash. 
See every angle
Vermont Estate
The elegant estate 
What we love: thinking about all the books we could read in that library. 
Just picture it
Historic Victorian Home
The historic Victorian 
What we love: dreaming about a long soak in that clawfoot tub. 
Imagine that
Chic Nashville home
The chic retreat 
What we love: soaking up the panoramic views from that indoor patio. 
Take it in
Dallas Midcentury Home
The Mid-Century masterpiece 
What we love: picturing post-pool hangouts in that living room. 
 
Zillow, ‌Inc.
1301 ‌Second ‌Avenue, ‌Floor ‌31
Seattle, ‌WA ‌98101
© ‌2006-2019
 

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    Climate Change is Real

    Clients of mine moving from Sonoma to Vermont

    This is the view from their home ..... see below

    Does everyone know that this is a case of climate change ?

    A cold front in the Midwest is pushing winds to the west and the fall winter rain is late - unheard of situation 

    Climate change is real 

    Bless our area being grey and cold !

    Send some good thoughts  to these residents !
     

     

     

     

     

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      The Raven's Nest

      The Raven's Nest

      The Raven’s Nest
      Building My Getaway
      For many years during midlife, I led the transient
      lifestyle of a commuting airline pilot. Twenty plus years of a
      suitcase always open either coming or going. A life of splendid
      vistas perhaps, but unending bouncing around from place to place
      amidst chaos and noise. I longed for my little spot to retreat
      to. And so, I spent many, many days off from the commute,
      searching for a suitable spot that would provide the privacy and
      peacefulness I longed for.
      After several years of continuous searching, I found 4523
      Duffy Hill Rd. more average than I had envisioned, but the spot
      is breathtaking. I was hooked. The task would be daunting as
      this was 105 acres of raw land, i.e. no electrical power; no
      well and no driveway. And the building site I chose was a long
      way uphill. AHH, but the potential was, and I dare say still is,
      unlimited!
      So, having made the decision to go ahead with a huge task,
      I set about to design a house that would blend to the site and
      be, at once, smallish cozy and efficient, yet open and airy and
      take advantage of the splendid views.
      For the six years until my forced retirement at age 60, I
      spent countless hours in hotel and in the back of airplanes
      whilst commuting, sketching and resketching plans. It had to be
      simple, open and affect maximum utilization of space. It was at
      times, very frustrating to blend the needs into an efficient
      design. I learned a lot.

      I was very fortunate to find a master wood working guru in
      my neighbor Rodger Adkins. Rodger was eager to assist me with
      the project and we hired another local carpenter to assist. The
      three of us set to work enclosing the timber frame erected by
      the Liberty Head Post & Beam Co. of Huntington, VT. The
      adventure commenced the second week of July, 2002 and continues

      yet, as there is no boundary on what this special site can
      become.
      I have now reached a turning point in age, relationships
      and financial capabilities whence it is time to pass the torch
      on to new owner(s), who are likewise smitten with this special
      place and who also see the vast potential it holds. Fresh
      visions will continue to enhance the natural splendor of this
      spot.
      I depart with the satisfaction that others will gather on
      the porch, wine glasses in hand and converse in low tones about
      the magnificent unfolding sunset, the deer in the meadow below,
      and of plans for the X-country ski trail; or the sugar house, or
      the guest house or...
      The Raven’s Nest really is an as yet, unfinished canvas.
      August 2017

       

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        Look at what one of my creative clients is doing!

        Did you know there's a shrimp farm in Vermont

        By Ike Bendavid 

        CHARLOTTE, Vt. (WCAX) When you think of Vermont agriculture, dairy or maple probably come to mind. But our Ike Bendavid found out that a shrimp farm has popped up in Charlotte.

        What once was a dairy barn, is filled with 80,000 shrimp in a landlocked state.

        Reporter Ike Bendavid: What do people say when you tell them you are growing shrimp in Vermont?
        John Brawley: They kind of go, 'Whaaaaa??'

        Brawley spent most of his career growing oysters in Massachusetts. The former UVM student decided to come back to Vermont to be a shrimp farmer.

        Ike Bendavid: It doesn't have that fishy smell.
        John Brawley: No.
        Ike Bendavid: Why is that?
        John Brawley: Because they are all alive. If they were dead you would smell them.
        Ike Bendavid: That's a good answer.

        The tanks are filled with a few thousand gallons of saltwater which took months to balance with the bacteria to keep the shrimp alive. The brown color of the water comes from the animals' food.

        "The gist is maintaining water quality, preventing diseases, making sure the water is survivable for the shrimp," Brawley explained.

        So why grow shrimp in Vermont? Brawley says shrimp are usually imported long distances from exotic locations. He says his farm-raised shrimp have nothing added to them and will bring a local and fresh ingredient to menus around the state.

        "These shrimp will be unprocessed, head-on, which is hard to find because the shelf life for head-on shrimp is relatively short," Brawley said.

        Ike Bendavid: When you hear shrimp from Vermont, what goes through your mind?
        Dana Pontbriand/Vermont Meat and Seafood Market: The initial reaction is like, 'What?' It sounds pretty odd.

        But not odd enough to stop Pontbriand from putting it on the market. The owner of Vermont Meat and Seafood plans to put the Vermont shrimp on their seafood shelves next to fresh seafood from around the world. He says educating customers is key.

        "If shrimp were never frozen, that really matters to people. And if you are helping out a local business with us and him, I mean, it's a pretty cool story," Pontbriand said.

        Shoppers say what they look for is quality.

        "I found being in Vermont things taste good. So, if the shrimp taste good just like in the Gulf or anywhere else, I would buy it definitely," said Matt Miller of Pennsylvania. 

        Back at the farm, the big question is about taste and Brawley approves.

        "It's more savory, more shrimpy flavor," he said. 

        Some restaurants have featured the shrimp in events already this year but you can expect to see the shrimp on menus and in markets by the end of the year.

         

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          Save The Date! Single Parent Program Celebration!

           
           

          Be a part of the ripple effect

           

          Please join us for the annual celebration of the 

          Champlain College Single Parents Program, 

          now in its 32nd year.

           

          The Single Parents Program lifts up single parents in our community by providing exceptional advocacy and support to its participants through workshops, access to resources and services designed to help students reach their educational and professional dreams.  

          Graduates gain relevant skills through post-secondary education to become financially independent which has a multi-generational impact.

          Hosted by Diana McCargo & Peter Swift, 

          Liz & Jim Foster, and Betsy Rich 

           

          Thursday, October 3, 2019
          5:30-7:30 PM

          Cocktails & hors d' oeuvres

          Philo Ridge Farm, 2766 Mt Philo Road,
          Charlotte, Vermont 05445

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            First Half 2019 Stats

            We are pleased to provide our noteworthy stats for the first half of 2019. We've accomplished some great results with our new website, paid search ads, print advertising, and social media. Click on the image below to view the full report from Four Seasons Sotheby's International Realty. 

            Contact the Kathy O'Brien Team for all of your Vermont real estate needs. We're happy to share our expertise with you!

            1st Half 2019 Stats: Four Seasons Sotheby's International Realty

            Union Station in Burlington

            Final Report Recommends Union Station for Amtrak Train Storage

            By Seven Days, Sarah Tabin

            click to enlargeThe Union Station site, facing south - CHITTENDEN COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

            • CHITTENDEN COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION
            • The Union Station site, facing south

            A report has named Burlington's Union Station as the best place to store trains overnight once Amtrak's Ethan Allen Express begins service to the Queen City in 2021 or 2022.�

            Union Station, at 1 Main Street, scored highest among five potential sites in a final report released by the Chittenden County Regional Planning Commission on July 17. The report considered costs, noise and impacts on current rail operations, among other factors.�

            The report is the final draft of a study released last summer that also�endorsed Union Station, according to Eleni Churchill, the commission's transportation program manager. The commission beefed up its data collection on noise and air quality�after�neighbors voiced concerns at a public meeting�in June 2018, she said.�

            Study Suggests Burlington's Union Station for Overnight Train Storage

            BY SARA TABIN

            "Understandably, there are people who are concerned with having the train parked overnight in front of certain sites," Churchill said. "Theres going to be some impacts, but were going to see the benefits of this train coming into Burlington."�

            The commission studied four other locations to store the 680-foot-long train: The Northern Urban Reserve, a parkland north of Waterfront Park along the bike path; Southern Urban Reserve, an area immediately north of the Lake Champlain Community Sailing Center; Vermont Rail System's railyard near Perkins Pier; and Flynn Avenue, adjacent to the new City Market, Onion River Co-op store.�

            The Vermont Agency of Transportation will make the final decision, but it isn't bound by the report's recommendations or to any particular timeline, according to Dan Delabruere, the rail program director at VTrans.�

            We are actually going to look at that study and even other options," he said. We really need to look at everything to make this decision. I don't know that were close to making a decision at this point.�

            The Ethan Allen Express train shuttles passengers between Rutland and New York City. Once other upgrades are complete, it will include northern stops in Middlebury and Vergennes before overnighting in Burlington from 8 p.m. to 7 a.m.
            click to enlargeThe proposed train storage sites - CHITTENDEN COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION

            • CHITTENDEN COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION
            • The proposed train storage sites


            All potential sites would need some upgrades to accommodate the trains.�

            At $300,000, Union Station is the least expensive option. The costliest is the railyard: It would cost upward of $50 million to relocate the existing railyard to make room for the passenger train, according to the study. Both Urban Reserve sites are in the $2.2 million range, where Flynn Avenue would cost about $1.5 million.�

            The station scored high for its existing electrical infrastructure and low impacts to both natural resources and existing train travel. But it was the only site of the five to score a zero, the lowest possible rating, for both its proximity to residences and air quality impacts.�

            Union Station is located closest to residences the nearest is just 50 feet away compared to a nearly 530-foot buffer at all the other sites. But it impacts the fewest homes overall just 26, about half as many at either Urban Reserve, according to the report.�

            While Delabruere didn't want to comment much on citizens' concerns, he�did�dispel the notion that the trains would idle overnight. The trains�would be outfitted with "hot start" equipment, he said, which only require a 20- to 40-minute warm up and cool down. They'd only idle for longer periods if the outside temperature is -20 degrees or colder, he said.�

            Amtrak service can't start in Burlington, however, until Middlebury finishes its own massive rail project. The Addison County town is in the midst of replacing two century-old rail bridges with a new tunnel,�Delabruere said.�

            "There's some time between now and when the Middlebury tunnel project will be complete, he said.�We have some time to think about this, and I don't know that we're forced into making a decision.�

            Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger said the city hasn't taken a formal position on the issue, noting it's "in conversations" with VTrans as the agency deliberates.�

            We dont have control, but we definitely have a voice," Weinberger said. "This is something weve fought for and wanted to see happen for a long time, so its exciting that were getting to the point where were actually talking about the details.�
            �

            �

            �

            �


            �

            �

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              Changes in South Burlington

              Changes at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington

              9:38 a.m. EDT July 31, 2019

                

              "Hillside," a single- and multi-family housing development is envisioned for the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington, as seen in this aerial rendering by Russ DeSantis Photography and Lincoln Brown Illustration. The view is from the south west, with Burlington International Airport and Kennedy Drive at left; Mt. Mansfield in the center distance. The light-colored multi-story buildings in the foreground are older properties that were built on portions of the farm: Lancaster at O’Brien Farm and Stonington Circle at O’Brien Farm.

              COURTESY NEIL DIXON, O'BRIEN BROTHERS

              A site map for Hillside at the O'Brien Farm, a housing development under construction in South Burlington. Future phases of building are planned for parcels at the left and top of this image created for O'Brien Brothers, the development firm.

              A site map for Hillside at the O'Brien Farm, a housing development under construction in South Burlington. Future phases of building are planned for parcels at the left and top of this image created for O'Brien Brothers,

              New homes, constructed and in the works, redefine a portion of the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019. 

              New homes, constructed and in the works, redefine a portion of the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019.

              JOEL BANNER BAIRD/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. 

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. 

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. The map shows the area a few years ago. 

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. The map shows the area a few years ago.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Leo O'Brien, Jr., 85, and brother Daniel J. O'Brien, 82, look out over farmstead land on Old Farm Road in South Burlington their family has owned since 1944. The farm work stopped decades ago and the land is one of the last open parcels left in the city. Buy Photo

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              Leo O'Brien, Jr., 85, and brother Daniel J. O'Brien, 82, look out over farmstead land on Old Farm Road in South Burlington their family has owned since 1944. The farm work stopped decades ago and the land is one of the last open parcels left in the city.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of O'Brien Brother Agency, Inc., says current plans for development of the O'Brien family property off Old Farm Road in South Burlington include preserving the barn for public use. Buy Photo

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               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of O'Brien Brother Agency, Inc., says current plans for development of the O'Brien family property off Old Farm Road in South Burlington include preserving the barn for public use.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              From left, brother Daniel J. O'Brien and Leo O'Brien, Jr., grew up on the farmstead on Old Farm Road in South Burlington that they now want to turn into affordable, middle-class housing. Buy Photo

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               Share

              From left, brother Daniel J. O'Brien and Leo O'Brien, Jr., grew up on the farmstead on Old Farm Road in South Burlington that they now want to turn into affordable, middle-class housing.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              The barn on the O'Brien property on Old Farm Road in South Burlington. Buy Photo

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              The barn on the O'Brien property on Old Farm Road in South Burlington.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              Boulders, gravel and topsoil are stockpiled at the edge of a housing development under construction at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019. Buy Photo

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              Boulders, gravel and topsoil are stockpiled at the edge of a housing development under construction at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019.

              JOEL BANNER BAIRD/FREE PRESS

               

               

              Changes at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington


              12 PHOTOS

              9:38 a.m. EDT July 31, 2019

                

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              "Hillside," a single- and multi-family housig development is envisioned for the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington, as seen in this aerial rendering by Russ DeSantis Photography and Lincoln Brown Illustration. The view is from the south west, with Burlington International Airport and Kennedy Drive at left; Mt. Mansfield in the center distance. The light-colored multi-story buildings in the foreground are older properties that were built on portions of the farm: Lancaster at O’Brien Farm and Stonington Circle at O’Brien Farm.

              COURTESY NEIL DIXON, O'BRIEN BROTHERS

              A site map for Hillside at the O'Brien Farm, a housing development under construction in South Burlington. Future phases of building are planned for parcels at the left and top of this image created for O'Brien Brothers, the development firm.

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              A site map for Hillside at the O'Brien Farm, a housing development under construction in South Burlington. Future phases of building are planned for parcels at the left and top of this image created for O'Brien Brothers, the development firm.

              COURTESY O'BRIEN BROTHERS

              New homes, constructed and in the works, redefine a portion of the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              New homes, constructed and in the works, redefine a portion of the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019.

              JOEL BANNER BAIRD/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, near the site of a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. The map shows the area a few years ago. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. The map shows the area a few years ago.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Leo O'Brien, Jr., 85, and brother Daniel J. O'Brien, 82, look out over farmstead land on Old Farm Road in South Burlington their family has owned since 1944. The farm work stopped decades ago and the land is one of the last open parcels left in the city. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Leo O'Brien, Jr., 85, and brother Daniel J. O'Brien, 82, look out over farmstead land on Old Farm Road in South Burlington their family has owned since 1944. The farm work stopped decades ago and the land is one of the last open parcels left in the city.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of the O'Brien Brothers Agency, describes a planned residential development in South Burlington on Tuesday, February 28, 2017. The project is between Old Farm Road, Kimball Avenue and Route 116.

              GLENN RUSSELL/FREE PRESS

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of O'Brien Brother Agency, Inc., says current plans for development of the O'Brien family property off Old Farm Road in South Burlington include preserving the barn for public use. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Evan Langfeldt, CEO of O'Brien Brother Agency, Inc., says current plans for development of the O'Brien family property off Old Farm Road in South Burlington include preserving the barn for public use.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              From left, brother Daniel J. O'Brien and Leo O'Brien, Jr., grew up on the farmstead on Old Farm Road in South Burlington that they now want to turn into affordable, middle-class housing. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              From left, brother Daniel J. O'Brien and Leo O'Brien, Jr., grew up on the farmstead on Old Farm Road in South Burlington that they now want to turn into affordable, middle-class housing.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              The barn on the O'Brien property on Old Farm Road in South Burlington. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              The barn on the O'Brien property on Old Farm Road in South Burlington.

              RYAN MERCER/FREE PRESS

              Boulders, gravel and topsoil are stockpiled at the edge of a housing development under construction at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019. Buy Photo

               Email Twitter Facebook

               Share

              Boulders, gravel and topsoil are stockpiled at the edge of a housing development under construction at the O'Brien Farm in South Burlington on July 14, 2019.

              JOEL BANNER BAIRD/FREE PRESS

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                June 2019 Market Statistics in Chittenden County

                June 2019 Market Statistics

                The Northwestern Vermont Board of REALTORS® (NVBR) has released its market statistics for June 2019. The information is derived from data contained in the New England Real Estate Network and covers Chittenden, Franklin and Grand Isle Counties.

                Changes for June over last year at this time include:

                • New Listings increased 1.8 percent for Single Family homes but decreased 9.5 percent for Townhouse-Condo properties.
                • Pending sales increased 28.6 percent for Single Family homes and increased 13.0 percent for Townhouse-Condo properties.
                • Inventory decreased 13.1 percent for single-family homes and 31.7 percent for Townhouse-Condo properties.
                • The median sales price was up 10.6 percent to $330,000 for Single Family homes and increased 9.7 percent to $252,500 for townhouse-condo properties.
                • Closed sales increased 8.4 percent for Single Family properties but decreased 25.2 percent for townhouse-condo properties.
                • Days on market increased 9.7 percent or to 68 days for Single Family homes but decreased 4.3 percent or to 67 days for the townhouse-condo market.
                • Month’s supply of inventory decreased 18 percent for Single Family units and decreased 30.3 percent for townhouse-condo units.

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                  What's Happening with City Place?

                  Miro Weinberger

                  Burlington Mayor Miro Weinberger reacts after an executive session briefing on the stalled CityPlace development project on Monday. Photo by Glenn Russell/VTDigger

                  BURLINGTON — Brookfield Asset Management is considering an “extensive” redesign of the major downtown CityPlace development project, an architect working on the project told a group of city officials outside of a City Council executive session within earshot of reporters Monday.

                  Architect Will Fellows of PKSB Architects told a group that included consultant Jeff Glassberg and former interim CEDO director David White that the planned changes were “quite radical” and could delay the project further. Developer Don Sinex told Fellows about the changes after Sinex learned about them from Brookfield.

                  Approached afterward by a reporter, Fellows, who has worked with Sinex on the project, said that his statements were not meant to be overheard.

                  “It’s all hearsay,” he said. “I really can’t talk about it.”

                  The site of the $220 million development has sat empty as projected construction start dates have come and gone. The one-year mark since construction stalled approaches in August.

                  With the exception of the removal of the billboards featuring Sinex surrounding the site last month, the site looks the same as it did following the conclusion of the demolition of the former mall last summer.

                  Mayor Miro Weinberger said the city expected Brookfield to make a statement later this week updating the public on the status of the project.

                  “The core of this is the private development, and I think it’s critical that Brookfield be the one to update the public on the status,” he said.

                  The city is planning on using $22 million in tax increment financing for public improvements, primarily to pay to connect Pine and St. Paul streets from Cherry to Bank streets, which would go through the development project.

                  Glassberg, the consultant hired by the city to manage their end of the project, gave the update to the council in executive session. After the meeting, he said “change” was going to be the theme of Brookfield’s communication.

                  “Our effort is to get construction underway, and we’re trying to figure out the shortest path to get there,” he said

                  Weinberger would not confirm or deny if Brookfield was considering major design changes.

                  “I’ll have a lot more to say when they have done what is really their job, which is to update the public and everyone who’s been involved in this bidding process,” Weinberger said.

                  Glassberg said he did not know if there were going to be major design changes.

                  “We’ve got a whole lot of issues in the air with the project developer,” he said. “It’s the third week of July and they’re not under construction. Something is likely to change.”

                  While concerns from the public and city officials about the lack of construction progress on the project continues to grow, Brookfield has vowed that the company was completely committed to the project and working toward starting construction.

                  Neither Sinex nor representatives of Brookfield were present at Monday’s meeting.

                  Voegele, the senior vice president for development of Brookfield Properties, did not respond to calls and emails requesting an update on the project. Sinex replied to an email only to say that questions should be directed to Voegele.

                  In May Brookfield was working on finalizing the project’s financing after securing a term sheet from the Bank of the Ozarks. Voegele said Brookfield was also evaluating the project’s design, reviewing construction bids, working with the city on utilizing tax increment funding, or TIF, for public improvements and fighting a lawsuit filed by project opponents.

                  These steps were laid out in a check-list of “milestones” that the developers had to accomplish before the restart of construction, according to a memo Brookfield provided to the City Council. It’s unclear how much progress has been made on the steps laid out in that memo.

                  City attorney Eileen Blackwood recommended Monday’s update be held in executive session as it related to the city’s development agreement with the developers. Progressive councilors Max Tracy and Perri Freeman voted against holding the executive session.

                  Brookfield’s last appearance before the City Council was April 30, when Voegele said that Brookfield could not specify a date for the restart of construction. Brookfield said they were aiming for a June 1 restart after Sinex told VTDigger in March that construction would restart May 6.

                  While Sinex had been the public face of the project, Brookfield increased its involvement last fall and told the council in January that Brookfield was now involved in the day-to-day management of the project.

                  By 

                  Aidan Quigley / VTDigger's Burlington and Chittenden County reporter. 

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